Screen Sizes & Mobile Dominance

 Full disclosure...

Full disclosure...

This blew my mind just now. Shoutout to Jack Hallam for suggesting this post.

So we’re working on the site for a client with exacting standards for design. Nothing crazy, but the project requires extra consideration and finagling. We were delving into the intricacies of website page width, in particular looking at the break points where a page collapses down with responsive design. 

Still with me? Bare with me?

Best practice today is a mobile responsive website. This just means the site can display in different size formats, to accommodate the different physical screen sizes out there. From desktop to tablet to mobile, anything in between, and all variations of each. 

The peculiar thing is that we used to have standards for website widths. But after November 2016, when mobile overtook desktop for web usage; we’re now in a completely different web world.

Mobile Overtaking Desktop for Web Usage

(November 2016 is the moment)

 
StatCounter-comparison-ww-monthly-200901-201801.png
 

According to one of my favorite stat sites ever, the most common page width right now is 360x640 pixels: a mobile phone. That’s quite the shift: considering the web came from desktops, was initially designed for desktops, and has been a predominantly desktop-based experience until now.

Mobile Screen Resolution (360x640) Taking Over Desktop (1366x768)

(August 2016 is the moment)

 
StatCounter-resolution-ww-monthly-201601-201612.png
 

Heads up: VR is around the corner. If we’re thinking exponentially, which we should, mobile as a predominant device will be a blip on the radar of technological evolution. 

You can even see how mobile has wavered after screaming past desktop. Maybe people went back to desktop in some nostalgic reaction to the takeover. 

I still use desktop as my main driver. But that’s only as long as tablets lack the power to run the full experience. I need my trillion tabs, full featured apps, spreadsheets, keyboard and mouse. Tablets are at 75% of this capacity, and therefore just outside spec. 3-5 more years should do it. 


90 Day Content Challenge: Day 21